Videos

Sales Lessons from Careers on Camera: Sports Broadcaster Amanda Borges

What do salespeople and sports broadcasters have in common? Connecting with people on video and getting them to open up!

Salespeople are discovering first-hand how difficult it is to connect with customers on video.  Talking to a camera is not a natural skill.  Yet actors, sportscasters, reporters and news announcers are proof it is possible to connect and engage with audiences virtually. 

In this episode of “Sales Lessons from a Career on-Camera” I talk to sports broadcaster Amanda Borges about how finding your voice on video, forming connections, asking good questions, scripting, improv, and much more!  

About Amanda: Amanda Borges has interviewed more than 100 athletes and coaches and she’s scripted and hosted more than 30 live shows, either in-studio or on-location.  She traveled with the New York Rangers as their Team Reporter and Producer before moving to the national stage interviewing all types of athletes for Yahoo! Sports.  Most recently Amanda launched a podcast to share stories about women who work in sports called “And So She Goes.” 

Key Takeaways:

Talking to the camera:

“There’s a lot of acting that is involved in being on camera – even though it sounds so confusing, even though you want to be yourself and you want to portray the true person that you are, you have to crank it up a notch.”

Working with a script:

“I need to know what I’m going to say, and I need to be able to say it in a way where it doesn’t sound like I am reading off every single line in my head. There is a way to come across as natural, even though you’re reading a script.” 

Getting people to open up: 

“My biggest thing is to just be relatable – people open up and are more willing to talk to you if they can relate to you. Once you open up to them, you open that door for them to be vulnerable with you as well.” 

Preparation:

“Study as much as possible and know as much as possible, but just make sure that once you’re there, focus on that connection with that person because if you truly know what you’re supposed to say, it’ll just come out naturally in the conversation.”

Advise for salespeople:

“What do these people want to know? What can I bring them that they can’t get anywhere else? My advice is, don’t get caught up on how you look or how you’re speaking… as long as you can keep people engaged with your energy and the content that you’re presenting, that’s what’s most important.”

Don’t miss upcoming interviews and the latest video tips – subscribe to the Selling On Video Youtube channel today! 

Connect with Amanda:

LinkedIn:  linkedin.com/in/borgesamanda

Website and Podcast: http://www.andsoshegoespod.com/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Aborgesn

Hate the way you look on video? How to change that for good!


Do you hate the way you look on video?! You are not alone.

Almost no one sees themselves on video and says, “You know what, I look fantastic!” In fact, in a poll of nearly 500 salespeople, not liking how they looked on-camera was ranked the 3rd biggest challenge with being on video.

While there are some technical things you can do to improve the way you look on-camera, such as improving your lighting, making sure you’re framed well, and upgrading your camera, most of the time the problem is not your physical appearance. As long as you are maintaining professional dress and grooming, and have decent equipment, you will look fine. The real problem is that apprehension that you’re carrying around about how you look and specific behaviors you’re exhibiting.

Before virtual selling, there were very few opportunities for us to come face to face with how we look in real time, so a little apprehension is expected. 

The secret isn’t about looking good, it’s about feeling good!

When you feel insecure or uncertain about the way you look on camera, that informs the way you speak, move and talk. As well as how your audience sees you. Instead of your normally engaging self, that lack of confidence can read as disengaged or under-prepared to customers.

So, quit beating yourself up about the way you look and instead focus on these concrete tactics that will have you feeling camera ready in no time.

Get specific about why you don’t like the way you look …

You must first understand why you think that you look terrible. Only when you understand what’s behind the why, will you actually take steps to improve the way you feel about your appearance on screen.

One strategy is to record your next video sales call and watch it back. I know! This is the worst part! But I want you to watch it in a very specific way:

How to review yourself on a video call:

  • Look for what you did well. Perhaps you have a nice, inviting tone. Your head was still and not moving back and forth in front of the camera. Taking note of the positives first makes you a tad less critical for this next step.
  • Identify the specific things you are doing that makes you cringe. Stay constructive by asking yourself specific questions. For example, “how is my eye contact” or “am I using engaging body language/hand gestures?” or “am I moving within frame?”
  • Now that you know what specific behavior is affecting how you see yourself on video (and therefore how you feel!) find out what training or tools you need to improve. It could be an on-camera master class or coaching or searching online for the right vocal drills.

Get your free 20-Point Video Self-Evaluation

Want to really understand how you’re coming across in your video selling journey – the good, the bad, and the ugly?  Download this  free 20-Point Self Evaluation.

Want more help Selling on Video? 

*For free tips, tricks and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

*For improving your confidence, credibility and connection with customers on video, check out the self-paced Selling On-Camera Master Class.

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

3 Ways to Improve Interaction on Virtual Sales Calls

Are you having trouble getting customers to respond and interact when on a virtual call?! The problem is that virtual audiences tend to be more passive – engaging less and observing more.

Here are three quick and easy tips that will really change the level and amount of responsiveness you get from customers when leading a sales call.

Virtual Engagement Tip #1: Pause. Pause. Pause!

It’s time that we, as salespeople, finally embrace the uncomfortable silences! Cringe-worthy, I know, just bear with me.

When on a virtual call, it is imperative that you pause much longer than feels comfortable following a question asked. Here’s why – People need to, one, hear the question and, two, have the time to then process what has been asked of them. Most importantly, if/when there are multiple people on the call, a customer must often consider whether to leave the question to their fellow attendees or answer it themselves. While waiting for an answer, any answer at all, the sales person rushes to fill the silence, unable to stand the quiet any longer. That, my friends, is the death of a sales call, so I encourage you get comfortable with the uncomfortable.

Virtual Engagement Tip #2:  Expect an Answer

I hear a lot of so-called questions from sales people that go a little something like this, “What kind of results are you getting today.” Sounding more like a statement rather than an explicit question, this doesn’t elicit the desired result – audience engagement!

You must be very clear, almost painfully so, that you expect a response, an answer to your question. Instead, it should sound something like this, “Tell me, what kind of results are you getting today?” With intentional word choice and the slight modifications in vocal intonation and body language, this second question demands the response you are looking for.

Virtual Engagement Tip #3: Eye Contact is Key

Or, rather, camera contact is key! Meaning this – you need to look at the camera, not the attendees on the screen below, when asking a question. It’s much different to be on the receiving end of a question directed right to your eyes than somewhere at your chin or feet.  By looking into the eye of the camera, you are looking into the eyes of your customers.

There you have it! Three quick ways to improve interaction on customer virtual sales calls. Try them out and do let me know how they work.

Want more help Selling on Video? 

*For free tips, tricks and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

*For improving your confidence, credibility and connection with customers on video, check out the self-paced Selling On-Camera Master Class.

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

Virtual Screen Presence Tip #1: Show Personality

Why are a handful of people so compelling on screen while most others seem to instantly fade from memory? They have learned how to develop what many actors have, which is virtual screen presence.  A quality that makes an actor connect with his audience and bring his/her words, expressions and lines come to life.

In today’s world, screen presence is as vital for an actor as it is for a salesperson trying to connect with a customer.  And the good news is, it can be learned.

One element of virtual screen presence is your personality.  Have you ever felt a strong connection with someone who shows very little of their personality?  Likely not. What is there to connect to?!  When you’re nervous or uncomfortable on-camera, your personality can disappear and that makes for a highly forgettable call.

Virtual Screen Presence Tip #1:  Show Personality

So how do you show more personality in a call?  It starts with confidence.  Confidence comes from knowing how to talk and move on-camera – which is often counter-intuitive and much different than in live meetings.  Until this becomes second-nature, you can appear very stiff and unnatural to your audience.  And all the lighting and camera angles in the world can’t fix that!

Once you are confident on-camera, you can start to unlock your personality. In this video tip I show you how a simple adjustment can take a customer call from mediocre to memorable.

Want more help Selling on Video? 

*For free tips, tricks and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

*For improving your confidence, credibility and connection with customers on video, check out the self-paced Selling On-Camera Master Class.

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

{New Video} My customer doesn’t use video. Why should I?

“My customer doesn’t use video.  Why should I? ”

This is one of the biggest excuses I hear from sellers on why they don’t use video more on sales calls.  And I say excuse, because it’s not a good reason.

Why?  Because the seller is making a choice based on his/her own comfort and inability to feel connected – not the customers.  And if you’re truly a customer-focused salesperson, your comfort needs to come second.

Yes, in a perfect virtual world, you and your customer would both have your camera on.  You’d be able to read each other’s body language and expressions, share eye contact and both feel more comfortable and connected.

But we don’t live in a perfect world.  Customers are not always going to have their camera on (especially after all the uncomfortable vendor encounters they’ve been subjected to!), but they can still benefit by feeling more connected to YOU – seeing your eyes, body language and expressions.

So absolutely do what you can to encourage your customer to use his/her camera, but ultimately, it’s more important that you use yours.  No excuses.

BTW, when sellers say they’re not using video because the customer doesn’t, it often masks a deeper discomfort with being on-camera — simply because they don’t have the necessary skills or training specific to this new environment.

Find out how you can get the skills you or your team needs to communicate with confidence and credibility with video at SellingOn-Camera.com

The Selling On-Camera Master Class!

Feel like you’re not connecting with customers on video?  Unsure where to look or how to move?  Difficulty engaging your customers or expressing your personality when the camera’s on?

You’re not alone.  Speaking on-camera is not a natural skill.  And very few salespeople have any formal training on how to communicate effectively with customers on-camera.

That’s why I launched The Selling On-Camera Master Class: to help sellers master the art & science of connecting with customers on-camera with techniques I learned as an actor transitioning from stage to screen!

Here’s a sample from the self-paced video course:

The Selling On-Camera Master Class was designed specifically to help you become a confident and compelling salesperson on video – one who customers will remember and choose to do business with.

You’ll Learn how to:

  • Create natural eye contact that builds relationships
  • Deliver your message with confidence and impact
  • Gesture and move within your “frame”
  • Read listener body language
  • Increase audience interaction and responsiveness
  • Transition between camera, notes and slides
  • Record engaging videos to send to prospects
  • Channel nerves into positive energy
  • And much more!

Your Selling On-Camera Master Class Includes:

The Master Class Video Series

10 videos with guided exercises to help you master the technique of selling on-camera.

Virtual Selling On-Camera Resource Guide and Tools

Cameras, lighting, background, microphones – the latest information on what you really need to look and sound your best on-camera, and where to find it!

+ Optional Video Call Evaluation and Coaching

Practice your skills with a professional and receive feedback and coaching on delivering your own virtual presentation, pitch, or story.   Plus, get a 20 point evaluation of your “virtual stage.”

Join me in the Selling On-Camera Master Class today!  *

*Starting at just $297!

#virtualselling #video #videotraining #videocalls

New Video: The One Person You Should NEVER Look at on a Video Call!

To suddenly see yourself on a video call is both extremely compelling and distracting. Up until recently, we’ve all remained blissfully unaware of that funny thing we do with our mouth, the frequency with which we blink, or the unflattering shadows under our eyes. It is not a small thing to come face to face with how others see you.

Which is precisely why the one person you should never make eye contact on a video call is YOU.

Like most myths, the Greek god Narcissus falling in love with his own image was based on human impulses. Focusing on yourself is a pool you don’t want to fall into, even for a second.

I see so many salespeople clearly checking their image, then glancing back to their customer, then back to their image again to see if anything has changed! Not only does this take you completely out of the moment, but it looks as if you are oddly distracted to your customer.

Like any performer, you need to do your preparation and practice “off-camera.” Learn the technique. Record yourself practicing it. Then when you’re on a video call with a customer, hide your image. Don’t turn off your video, just hide your image so you don’t fall prey to the siren call of your image. That way you will remain 100% focused on your customer – which is much more important than if you have a hair out of place!

Pro tip:  To hide your image on Zoom, simply right click on your video and select Hide my image.

Want to appear your most confident and credible on video calls?  Check out my Selling On-Camera Master Class, now enrolling!

Through 10 Videos with self-guided exercises* you’ll learn how to:

  • Create natural eye contact that builds relationships
  • Deliver your message with confidence and impact
  • Gesture and move within your “frame”
  • Read listener body language
  • Create professional background and lighting
  • Increase audience interaction and responsiveness
  • Seamlessly transition between camera, notes and slides
  • Channel nerves into positive energy
  • And much more!

Classes start at $147 with pre-launch code:  PRELAUNCH

Learn more here.

 

Confidence in Sales

Confidence in sales can be elusive.

I hear a lot of advice a long the lines of “just be confident!” from sales coaches.  But I think most salespeople know that confidence is important in sales.  The question is – how do you gain confidence?  And if you’re not confident, does that mean you don’t belong in sales?

I think it’s a myth that great salespeople are always confident.  I think they may know how to get themselves into a state of confidence, or they have the courage to persevere even when they don’t feel confident and trust that the confidence will come.

Sometimes, let’s face it, you’re having a bad day, you had a fight with your spouse, you lost a deal.  Sometimes, you simply can’t think your way into greater confidence.  For those times, I want to share with you a really practical technique I learned as an actor.

It’s called Acting as if. And it works like this.  Next time you’re feeling really confident, notice what that looks like and sounds like for you.  Maybe you stand taller, gesture more, speak louder, or hold eye contact longer.

Then when you have to get on that call or give a presentation when you’re not feeling 100% confident, apply these confident behaviors as you’re practicing. Push through even when it feels awkward and uncomfortable and maintain those confident behaviors in your meeting. In other words, act as if you have great confidence.  9 times out of 10 you’ll find that pretty quickly you are actually feeling confident and good.  It’s much like forcing yourself to smile can make you feel happier.

So go out there and show confidence, and if you can’t, act as if until the real deal kicks in.

Read more on building Confidence in Sales here. 

{Video} It takes a compelling presentation to win business today

Why your presentation must be compelling

If your prospect had a remote, would he be tempted to change the channel on your presentation or demo?  That’s a tough question to ask yourself, but given the number of choices today’s buyers have and the demands on their attention, you need to take a hard look at just how compelling your presentation or demo is to your audience.

The bar has been raised. And if you haven’t raised your presentation game with it, you’re going to get left behind.  We live in a time where most people have been exposed to hundreds, maybe thousands of presentations.  Showing up and walking through a slide deck and parading our your features and benefits like salespeople have been doing for decades, is not going to help you win deals.

Today’s presentations have to be better than average, they have to be compelling in order to break through the clutter, stand out from the competition, and move buyers to the next step in the sales cycle.  And by compelling I’m not talking about slides, or templates or platforms, but rather great substance, structure and delivery. The elements that make your prospect say, “Wow, they really understand us.” And that, my sales friends, is compelling.

If you’re uncertain whether your presentation is compelling or not, shoot me an email and let’s talk.  Don’t wait to find out until your prospect changes the channel from you…to your competition.

 

Sales Presentation Role Play: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly – #1 The Opening

If  you’re having trouble closing…it could be your presentation opening!   If you don’t gain your audience’s attention initially and establish credibility, they’re not going to hear your great benefits, your value proposition or your super close!

In this video I role-play how a typical presentation opens.  Take a moment to watch.

What did you think?  I think I wasted a good 20 seconds of my audience’s time and lost some credibility… People have increasingly short attention spans and little patience for a lot of introductory fluff.  You have a precious few seconds to grab your listener’s attention and draw them in.   Don’t waste it

What’s the solution?

  1. Cut to the chase. Invest some time crafting a short, compelling opening that quickly delivers value and practice it until it shines. Having a rehearsed opening in your back pocket will give you a powerful boost of confidence and set the tone for the rest of your presentation.
  2. Eliminate the long intro’s, the thank you’s, the corporate overview /logo slide.
  3. Get more new ideas on powerful openings, here.

How did I start this video?  I jumped right in. Were you thinking, wow, I wish she’d tell us more about herself or her company?!  I doubt it.  Don’t open your presentation like everybody else if you want to make an impact and be remembered!

And, a good opening will make your closing much more effective!