Tag Archives: sports broadcasting

Tips to Connect with Customers on Camera with Sports Broadcaster Jen Mueller

Salespeople are discovering first-hand how difficult it is to connect with customers on camera. Talking to a camera is not a natural skill. Yet actors, sports broadcasters, reporters and, news announcers are proof it is possible to connect and engage with audiences virtually.

In this episode of “Sales Lessons from a Career on-Camera,” I speak with Jen Mueller, the Seattle Seahawks sideline radio reporter and member of the Seattle Mariners television broadcast team on ROOT SPORTS. Jen discusses connecting with your customer through conversation, the value of preparation, and truly owning your space.

About Jen Mueller:

Jen chose to pursue a career in sports broadcasting after continuously receiving comments from teachers, friends, and family that she “talks too much.” Now, with more than 15 years of sports broadcasting experience, she expertly provides straightforward business communication strategies as a keynote speaker and sales coach. In 2009, Jen founded Talk Sporty to Me after noticing a communication void in the workplace that could be filled with sports conversations. She is also the author of two books, Talk Sporty to Me: Thinking Outside the Box Scores and Game Time: Learn to Talk Sports in 5 Minutes a Day for Business.

Key Takeaways:

The truth about connecting with your audience:

“I recognize that people are hung up on scripting and camera presence because they think it’s inauthentic. It’s about reaching your audience where they are, and your audience needs this from you.”

Conversation is key:

“I know that conventional wisdom is, ‘Hey, just ask people about themselves because people love to talk about themselves.’ And that is a terrible way to get a lot of people that are making buying decisions to talk because why in the world would I let my guard down when you’re trying to get me to part with money or time or resources? So, we need to first understand the types of questions that you ask can set up those responses. It’s OK to get a one-word response, but you better be prepared for another question right after it.”

“When we are in a virtual space, we really don’t want to keep the audience guessing as to what happens next. We really want to be clear on what our expectations are and that could be the expectations for what we plan to get out of the conversation.

Be prepared:

“Make sure that every time you’re on camera you are prepared and expect that to be the only chance that you get.”

“When it’s actually time to be on camera, I’m not going in cold. I’ve already kind of warmed myself up. I’ve given myself the opening act. I’ve already got the energy level right. I’ve got the words right and I am in control of what’s happening and that’s where you want to be when you’re on video.”

Own the (virtual) room:

This is your space and you need to own and control that because this is all the audience knows about you.”

Making “eye” contact:

“I think most people misunderstand what a conversational interview is … They think the best way to get to that outcome is just to wing it and to react off of what the other person says because they think they’re going to be able to stay in the moment.”

Connect with Jen Mueller:

Twitter: @JenTalksSports

Instagram: @talksportytome

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jenmuellertalksporty/

Podcast: https://www.talksportytome.com/

Want more help Selling on Video? 

*For improving your confidence, credibility, and connection with customers on video, check out the self-paced Selling On Video Master Class.

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

*For free tips, tricks, and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

How to Build Relationships on Camera with Sports Broadcaster Joel Goldberg

What do salespeople and sports broadcasters have in common? Learn how to build relationships and communicate on-camera with Joel Goldberg.

In this episode of “Sales Lessons from a Career on-Camera,” I talk to Joel Goldberg, host of the Kansas City Royals pregame and postgame show on Fox Sports. Joel talks about what Major League Baseball was like for players and team members during 2020’s uncertain season, how he stays focused on camera, builds relationships with players and coaches, and continues to differentiate himself in a field where everyone now has access to information.

About Joel: Over the course of his twenty-five-year career in television, Joel Goldberg has devoted himself to developing and maintaining influential relationships with professional athletes, coaches, and team management. Joel has been a member of the Kansas City Royals broadcast team since 2008 where he has hosted over 300 pre/postgame shows. As a public speaker and presenter, Joel’s focus is on building culture and success through impactful storytelling. Most recently, he has launched a podcast where he compares the winning traits of sports to business called “Rounding the Bases.”

Key Takeaways:

Build long-lasting relationships:

“This business [sports broadcasting], first and foremost, is about relationships, and that’s no different than almost every other profession.” 

“What am I doing today that can help me tomorrow or down the road? Because we don’t know when the next version of this is coming or whatever the next ‘it’ is. And so, you can’t stop building those relationships or forming those relationships.”

Ask yourself, “What can you do to put the person on the other side at ease? When you’re able to do that, they’ll hopefully, in theory, let their guard down and you will get to know them a little bit better.”

Shine the spotlight on others:

“I just think when you get a chance to know people better and shine that spotlight on them, it opens up a lot of avenues for conversation.”

“Take a genuine interest in people. It goes a long way.”

Remove distractions:

“The fewer distractions you have in front of the camera, that includes a Zoom call or Microsoft teams or whatever it is, the more you can focus on being comfortable in front of the camera, also engaged in the conversation because your mind is there.”

“When you can push aside those distractions and listen, then you’re more engaged. When you’re more engaged, you have more of an understanding and an interest in what’s going on. When you have more of an interest in what’s going on, you get excited about it in the way that if you are sitting down next to a friend at a coffee shop or a bar or restaurant.”

Differentiate yourself:

“What can I do differently than everyone else? And now how can I bring that to people and be the one to bring that to people when no one else can? And so that’s sort of a view that is a huge responsibility to privilege to say, OK, what can I do to add value to people from an entertainment standpoint, from an information standpoint?”

The fine line between energy and volume:

“It is different on camera. I would say that there’s this fine line as a broadcaster and I think as an actor between energy and volume. I think that until we figure it out, we think when someone says have more energy, they think that means you get louder.”

Don’t miss upcoming interviews and the latest video tips – subscribe to the Selling On Video YouTube channel today! 

Connect with Joel:

Twitter: @goldbergkc

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joelgoldbergspeaker/

Website: https://joelgoldbergmedia.com/

Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/rounding-the-bases-with-joel-goldberg/id1308555875

Want more help Selling on Video? 

*For improving your confidence, credibility, and connection with customers on video, check out the self-paced Selling On Video Master Class.

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

*For free tips, tricks, and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

Sales Lessons from a Career on Camera: Sports Broadcaster Amanda Borges

What do salespeople and sports broadcasters have in common? Connecting with people on video and getting them to open up!

Salespeople are discovering first-hand how difficult it is to connect with customers on video.  Talking to a camera is not a natural skill.  Yet actors, sportscasters, reporters, and news announcers are proof it is possible to connect and engage with audiences virtually. 

In this episode of “Sales Lessons from a Career on-Camera” I talk to sports broadcaster Amanda Borges about how finding your voice on video, forming connections, asking good questions, scripting, improv, and much more!  

About Amanda: Amanda Borges has interviewed more than 100 athletes and coaches and she’s scripted and hosted more than 30 live shows, either in-studio or on-location.  She traveled with the New York Rangers as their Team Reporter and Producer before moving to the national stage interviewing all types of athletes for Yahoo! Sports.  Most recently Amanda launched a podcast to share stories about women who work in sports called “And So She Goes.” 

Key Takeaways:

Talking to the camera:

“There’s a lot of acting that is involved in being on camera – even though it sounds so confusing, even though you want to be yourself and you want to portray the true person that you are, you have to crank it up a notch.”

Working with a script:

“I need to know what I’m going to say, and I need to be able to say it in a way where it doesn’t sound like I am reading off every single line in my head. There is a way to come across as natural, even though you’re reading a script.” 

Getting people to open up: 

“My biggest thing is to just be relatable – people open up and are more willing to talk to you if they can relate to you. Once you open up to them, you open that door for them to be vulnerable with you as well.” 

Preparation:

“Study as much as possible and know as much as possible, but just make sure that once you’re there, focus on that connection with that person because if you truly know what you’re supposed to say, it’ll just come out naturally in the conversation.”

Advice for salespeople:

“What do these people want to know? What can I bring them that they can’t get anywhere else? My advice is, don’t get caught up on how you look or how you’re speaking… as long as you can keep people engaged with your energy and the content that you’re presenting, that’s what’s most important.”

Don’t miss upcoming interviews and the latest video tips – subscribe to the Selling On Video Youtube channel today! 

Connect with Amanda:

LinkedIn:  linkedin.com/in/borgesamanda

Website and Podcast: http://www.andsoshegoespod.com/

Twitter:  https://twitter.com/Aborgesn

Want more help Selling on Video? 

*For improving your confidence, credibility, and connection with customers on video, check out the self-paced Selling On Video Master Class.

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

*For free tips, tricks, and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

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