Tag Archives: selling on-camera

Virtual Selling: Is this as good as it gets?


According to Gartner, 80% of B2B sales are expected to take place virtually by 2025. Don’t believe me?! Check out their projections here. Very few sellers I know will be applauding this news. Here’s why: we are only one year into the pandemic and virtual sales calls and meetings have only just begun to feel slightly less awkward and less ineffective as at the start, for both buyers and sellers alike. In fact, 70% of the salespeople surveyed by Corporate Visions said that selling virtually is not as effective as selling in person. Here are just a few of the many challenges I hear (and see) salespeople still struggling with today: Making consistent eye contact with a customer Reading, understanding, and responding to “video” body language Talking to customers who aren’t on video Engaging passive virtual audiences Connecting with multiple people on a video call What’s more, many companies are Read More

How Much Eye Contact Should You Be Making on a Video Sales Call


Maintain eye contact 2/3 of the time, experts have always said.  But that figure is based on in-person communication. But on video, that percentage should be closer to the 80-85% mark! Why Do You Need More Eye Contact on Video? When in-person – whether that be your office, a shared conference room, even a local coffee shop – you are sharing an environment with your customer. Meaning that if you break eye contact to look at your notes, a picture on the wall, or that delicious cup of joe in your hands, your customer knows exactly what you are looking at. No problem at all! In contrast, when you look away on video, your customer is no longer able to see what you are looking at. Left to their imagination, they may graciously assume that you are looking at their image or, worse yet, imagine that you are looking at Read More

Sellers Beware! Misleading Advice on Zoom Fatigue


Stanford University recently published an interesting study on the causes of ‘Zoom Fatigue.’ Researchers identified four main causes, one being: *Excessive amounts of close-up eye contact is highly intense While I don’t disagree with the study’s overall conclusion, I do disagree with the advice springing up around it suggesting people should REDUCE their level of eye contact on video calls. This is hugely misleading advice, especially for salespeople. Here’s why: Why Eye Contact Matters in Virtual Selling: Eye contact is a key ingredient in building relationships. In a virtual world, eye contact takes on even greater importance as other means of connecting with our customers are unavailable to us. Selling on Video Perceived attention is tied to your eye contact. Where our eyes go, our attention goes. Unlike in a live setting, your customer can’t tell where your attention is directed on a video call. All they know is that Read More

5 Tips for Building Successful Remote Sellers with Virtual Sales Role-Plays


Virtual selling may have your team reaching for the panic button – customers are different, technology is changing by the minute, and competition is as stiff as ever. When a marketplace changes so dramatically, sales leadership so too must change/adapt and prepare for sales calls in an entirely different manner. While sales role-playing is often met with apprehension and dread – if done well – it can help your sales reps practice and master communication skills required of remote selling and navigate the continually changing requirements (and restrictions) of selling virtually. Unfortunately, most salespeople approach the exercise with a gallows like resolve and this limits the opportunity to get the real transformative benefits that a virtual role-play can produce. 5 Tips for Successful Virtual Sales Role-Plays: It’s time that we change our tune about the dreaded sales role-play! As the sales manager, it is your responsibility to push for this Read More

5 Actor’s Secrets to Master Your Fear of Virtual Presentations


Waiting to be admitted to the Zoom meeting, you feel the nerves begin to set in. With each passing minute, confidence slowly turns to anxiety and tension as you second guess yourself – Do you have the right meeting ID? How well do you really know your material? Did you practice enough? – Now feeling awkward and uncertain, you either race or slog through the video call detached from your audience and your message – completely missing the mark (and the sale).  Virtual presentation nerves claim another victim. Actors are No Strangers to Performance Nerves An actor is no stranger to pre-show nerves! Though unlike the nervous salesperson silently sitting in front of their computer awaiting their doom, the well-trained actor knows that sitting still before a performance spells disaster – natural nervous energy quickly turns to tension when the body has no way to release it. Tension increases anxiety Read More

(Mis)Reading Body Language on Video Calls

Reading body language on video calls is like learning another language! Many movements and expressions can have completely different meanings on video than in-person – most of which have nothing to do with you or your message.

Misinterpreting those signals as a salesperson can cause you to lose your mojo – and the deal if you’re not in the know! Here is a common example of customer body language that is widely (mis)read on video:

Resting Business Face

“Resting Business Face” (noun) – informal

(Typically with reference to a salesperson or business professional) a bored, disinterested, or unhappy expression attributed to or unconsciously adopted by a person attempting to be professional during business meetings, video calls, etc.

As a salesperson trained to check-in or switch gears if your customer seems to be showing a lack of interest, it’s easy to take this blank stare personally and assume the worst:  My customer is bored, impatient, or disinterested – what do I do?! The knee jerk reaction for many salespeople is to rush through their presentation or call, growing ever more uncomfortable until their projection becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.  In reality, this assumption based on expression alone is typically incorrect.

What’s the problem?

The problem is that virtual audiences tend to be more passive – engaging less and observing more. Put the average person in front of a screen and they instantly slip into observer mode, they might as well be snacking on some popcorn and sipping a Coke (and this is especially true of customers who are anticipating a pitch or presentation). This passivity is communicated via limited body language and their expression (or lack thereof), AKA resting business face, is easily misinterpreted.

PRO TIP: Don’t let your customers be passive! By continuously checking-in/asking questions, you are ensuring that your customer is an active participant in the video call and not simply a passive observer.

For more information on how to improve customer interaction on virtual sales calls, click here.

How to Respond to (Mis)leading Body Language

The general rule of thumb on reading body language is simple – don’t overreact or jump to conclusions! Typically, a bored expression or someone sitting back in their chair does not guarantee boredom. When uncertain, look for information/facts that support your theory – Is their tone distant and flat? Does it seem like they are caught off guard when you ask a direct question? Do their answers reflect growing impatience? These concrete questions can indicate whether or not your customer is truly engaged, interested, or has something else entirely pressing on their mind.

Curious to learn more about reading and using body language, making eye contact, and keeping your audience engaged during your video calls? Check out the Selling On-Video Master Class.

Want more help Selling on Video? 

*For improving your confidence, credibility, and connection with customers on video, check out the self-paced Selling On Video Master Class.

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

*For free tips, tricks, and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

3 Movie Secrets for an Engaging Virtual Presentation


Looking for the secret to an engaging virtual presentation?! The movies have mastered the art of engaging audiences on-screen from years of practice and experimentation. While your virtual presentation doesn’t have to be worthy of an Oscar’s nod, it does pay to use these movie secrets for an engaging virtual presentation that stands out from the competition. 3 movie secrets for an engaging virtual presentation Cut to the chase Filmmakers know that people have increasingly short attention spans and little patience for a lot of exposition. A blockbuster film doesn’t start with the director’s commentary – featuring a clip outlining their filmography or detailing their artistic approach to the film’s creation. So, neither should you! Cut right to the chase… When the competition for a customer’s attention is stiff, there is no room for introductory fluff (and yes, I am talking about your corporate overview!) once you dive into your presentation. Read More

Pitch Perfect: 25 Tips for Virtual Sales Calls


In sales, you have only one shot to deliver the right message. In the blockbuster hit Pitch Perfect, Anna Kendrick’s character and her all-female acapella group must stay perfectly on pitch in order to win the regional acapella competition. (Spoiler alert – they do!) Clap Pitch Perfect2 GIF from Clap GIFs nbsp; In order to win the virtual sale, you too must also stay perfectly on pitch – using the right delivery to convey the right message to the right prospect. Customers are distracted, short on attention, and much less likely to engage virtually. To complicate matters, it’s difficult to read body language and gauge interest.  I’ve compiled 25 of my favorite tips for overcoming challenges and improving your success rate on virtual sales calls. Stay on pitch! 25 tips for a perfect virtual sales call Find your confidence: Confidence is vital to virtual sales! Why? Because the camera picks up Read More

How to Find the Best Lighting for Your Zoom Call


Lighting can make or break your Zoom call! Too dark and you look like you’re in a hostage video.  Too bright, and you look other-worldly.  Proper lighting allows your customer to properly see you, your facial expressions, and most importantly, your eyes – which is where they connect with you.

The best lighting for video is sitting directly facing your chosen light source, allowing the light to illuminate your face.  Avoid shadows and backlighting, which happens when you have your back to a window or other light source.

Here’s a quick and easy way to find the best lighting for your Zoom call.

Find your best light:

  1. Take your phone or tablet with you as you walk through your home or office to test the lighting in different areas.
  2. Flip the camera’s image so that you can see yourself on the screen.
  3. As you walk through your home or office, notice how different camera angles or windows affect the lighting.
  4. Find the best spot and stop! This is it.  Your best lighting spot for your video call. 

A warning about natural light:

The quality of natural light is subject to change throughout the day based on the position of the sun, so be sure to double-check your lighting before every video call. Lighting that was sufficient one day, may not be the next. Weather is another often-overlooked factor that can influence the quality of lighting on your video. If overcast, the sun may no longer be the most reliable light source available and you’ll need to supplement with artificial lighting. 

Tips on using artificial light:

If the weather is not on your side or you simply are not in close proximity to a window, you’ll need to find an artificial light that works for you. A properly placed lamp or a ring light can provide you with sufficient lighting for your video call. Experiment with the lights you have.  Often times replacing the harsh white bulbs with softer LED bulbs with a high CRI provide a more flattering look for video.

Note that artificial lighting can cause glare or reflection in your glasses. This can be fixed by adjusting the angle of the light, moving it farther away from you, or raising the earpiece of your glasses so that they tilt down slightly to avoid catching that glare.

Want more help Selling on Video? 

*For improving your confidence, credibility, and connection with customers on video, check out the self-paced Selling On Video Master Class.

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

*For free tips, tricks, and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

Virtual First Impression: 5 Secrets from the Stars


Your virtual first impression can make or break your sale. In the first few seconds of a video call, prospective customers quickly make decisions about you and your company and how (or whether) they’re going to listen to you. To ensure you’re making a strong first impression, look no further than your television screen. Most of the stars you see had to audition on film or video to make it past the eyes of critical casting directors and onto your screen. By applying the 5 secrets from the stars, you can gain an important competitive edge in your video calls: 5 Secrets from the Stars for a Memorable First Impression Be prepared: “We started every practice with that warm-up … We knew that sh*t like it was second nature. And that’s when magical stuff happens with acting: No mind, no body.” – Mark Ruffalo | Spotlight No star would ever Read More

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Performance Sales and Training: Persuasive Presentation Skills to meet the challenges of today’s B2B Sales Environment