Category Archives: Connecting on Video

Why All Virtual Sales Calls Should Start Full Video

Got ONE MINUTE? And want to know the ONE THING you can do to immediately improve your connection with your customer and increase interaction on virtual sales calls?

Always start with full video.

90% of the salespeople I coach are making the mistake of starting a video call already in a PowerPoint. The first few moments of any virtual sales call, presentation, or demo should be dedicated to establishing a connection with your customer. In order to do that, you need to be as visible as possible so that your audience can see your face, see your eyes and truly feel like they are connecting to a real person. When your image is a small box shoved to the corner of a screen, you will not feel real to your customer and your connection will suffer.

Remember to use the power of the human face and go full video often and you will draw the attention of your audience with ease and greatly improve your connection (and sales!).

PRO TIP: Plan ahead! As you move through your video call, identify moments that smoothly allow for you to transition between full video and sharing your screen: Perhaps it’s when you have finished up a topic and are summarizing. Perhaps it’s when you are taking questions at the end (this one is a given!).

Learn the Skills that will take you to the Next Level in Virtual Sales:  

In the  Selling On Video Master Class you’ll learn the unique skill set how to:

  • Make soft, personal eye contact that makes your customer feel heard and seen.
  • Understand when and how to look at the camera in a natural way.
  • Read customer body language without breaking your connection.
  • Understand what that unique video language your customer is using means – and when to react.
  • Improve the response rate to your questions and increase interaction.
  • Create more actively engaged customers.
  • Leverage your body language to reinforce what you’re saying, not distract from it.
  • And much more!

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

*For free tips, tricks, and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

Tips to Connect with Customers on Camera with Sports Broadcaster Jen Mueller

Salespeople are discovering first-hand how difficult it is to connect with customers on camera. Talking to a camera is not a natural skill. Yet actors, sports broadcasters, reporters and, news announcers are proof it is possible to connect and engage with audiences virtually.

In this episode of “Sales Lessons from a Career on-Camera,” I speak with Jen Mueller, the Seattle Seahawks sideline radio reporter and member of the Seattle Mariners television broadcast team on ROOT SPORTS. Jen discusses connecting with your customer through conversation, the value of preparation, and truly owning your space.

About Jen Mueller:

Jen chose to pursue a career in sports broadcasting after continuously receiving comments from teachers, friends, and family that she “talks too much.” Now, with more than 15 years of sports broadcasting experience, she expertly provides straightforward business communication strategies as a keynote speaker and sales coach. In 2009, Jen founded Talk Sporty to Me after noticing a communication void in the workplace that could be filled with sports conversations. She is also the author of two books, Talk Sporty to Me: Thinking Outside the Box Scores and Game Time: Learn to Talk Sports in 5 Minutes a Day for Business.

Key Takeaways:

The truth about connecting with your audience:

“I recognize that people are hung up on scripting and camera presence because they think it’s inauthentic. It’s about reaching your audience where they are, and your audience needs this from you.”

Conversation is key:

“I know that conventional wisdom is, ‘Hey, just ask people about themselves because people love to talk about themselves.’ And that is a terrible way to get a lot of people that are making buying decisions to talk because why in the world would I let my guard down when you’re trying to get me to part with money or time or resources? So, we need to first understand the types of questions that you ask can set up those responses. It’s OK to get a one-word response, but you better be prepared for another question right after it.”

“When we are in a virtual space, we really don’t want to keep the audience guessing as to what happens next. We really want to be clear on what our expectations are and that could be the expectations for what we plan to get out of the conversation.

Be prepared:

“Make sure that every time you’re on camera you are prepared and expect that to be the only chance that you get.”

“When it’s actually time to be on camera, I’m not going in cold. I’ve already kind of warmed myself up. I’ve given myself the opening act. I’ve already got the energy level right. I’ve got the words right and I am in control of what’s happening and that’s where you want to be when you’re on video.”

Own the (virtual) room:

This is your space and you need to own and control that because this is all the audience knows about you.”

Making “eye” contact:

“I think most people misunderstand what a conversational interview is … They think the best way to get to that outcome is just to wing it and to react off of what the other person says because they think they’re going to be able to stay in the moment.”

Connect with Jen Mueller:

Twitter: @JenTalksSports

Instagram: @talksportytome

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jenmuellertalksporty/

Podcast: https://www.talksportytome.com/

Want more help Selling on Video? 

*For improving your confidence, credibility, and connection with customers on video, check out the self-paced Selling On Video Master Class.

*For workshops, keynotes, and events, get in touch with us here.

*For free tips, tricks, and tools, sign up for our newsletter here.

Contact


Performance Sales and Training: Persuasive Presentation Skills to meet the challenges of today’s B2B Sales Environment