Are you making this common mistake in your presentation?


Too many sales presentations start out strong, only to run out of gas at the end.  Making this common mistake in your presentation leaves  buyers uninspired, unmotivated, and unlikely to take next steps.

Your  closing is second only in importance to your opening, yet it is often the least planned out part of a presentation.

An effective presentation close doesn’t happen by chance.   It takes planning and practice.  But as the final impression you make on your prospect, it’s well worth investing the time and effort.

5 ways to avoid making this common mistake in your presentation:

  1. Know your ending:

    This seems obvious, I know. But the truth is many presenters aren’t 100% certain where they’re going to end.  This leads to needless repetition, stopping at a weak point or just sort of trailing off…  Know exactly what your last line is.  Nail it.  Put a period on it and then stop talking!

  2. Bookend to your opening:

    You came up with a great attention-grabbing opening, right?! (Click here for help with your opening.)  a story, a theme or an interesting fact — don’t just deliver it once and let it die. Revisit it during your closing.  This will reinforce your point and provide a satisfying symmetry to your audience by bringing your presentation full circle.

  3. Deliver value:

    You’ve shown prospects how and what you’re going to deliver, but today’s decision-makers demand proof. In your closing, summarize what you can accomplish by providing facts, figures or case studies.

  4. Keep your energy up:

    It’s easy to let up on the gas after you’ve been driving home your message for awhile.  But remember your audience takes their cues from you.  If you drop off in your energy, your audience will start to tune out and think about what they need to do next. Keep your physical and vocal energy high to end on a strong and memorable note.

  5. Ask for next steps:

    You’ve built a strong case in your presentation so ask for something in return.  While not every presentation ends in a signed contract, you must ask for some type of action or commitment, otherwise you have just invested a lot of time and energy delivering an informative talk.

Now, I would be remiss if I didn’t close this post!  To stay ahead of your competition, I encourage you to sign up for my monthly newsletter for more tips, examples, and resources to help you close more deals!

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Performance Sales and Training: Persuasive Presentation Skills to meet the challenges of today’s B2B Sales Environment